Pibo Marquez and His Burning Hands

Pibo Marquez and His Burning Hands

by Michael Kurshan Emmer, PRCC
The messenger came on a plane from Venezuela, but the message that sang through the congas came from Africa. Each “toque” and “golpe” from the diaspora with a unique tone; this one may have been the voice of Obatalá, that one may have been Elegua; we would have to ask Joel “Pibo” Marquez to know for sure.
         “Pibo” Marquez, the Venezuelan musician, producer, composer and winner of the Ismael Rivera award, has had a successful career in music that has taken him around the world, showcasing his Afro-Latino music in more than 40 countries. With places such as Mali, Finland, Colombia, Greece, Brazil and many more as the set for his performances, the incredibly talented and gracious artist always makes sure to highlight the Afro-Latino rhythms and history in his sets. Having performed and recorded with many internationally acclaimed acts such as Arturo Sandoval, Juanes, and the Bogota Philharmonic Orchestra, among many others, the Venezuelan percussionist and teacher is the leader of “Pibo Marquez y su Descarga” (Salsa) and “Las Manos Calientes” (Jazz).
         Sponsored by the Humboldt Park Community As A Campus, the Puerto Rican Cultural Center, Old Town School of Folk Music, and the Consulate General of Venezuela in Chicago and performing for a packed room of community members and students at the Chicago High School for the Arts at 2714 W. Augusta Boulevard on Friday May 6, 2016, the Venezuelan percussionist introduced each folkloric rhythm with its background and structure as if he was speaking of an old friend. One rhythm at a time, he went through the gamut of Afro-Caribbean experiences: the Yambú and the Guaguanco Rumbas, the Bomba and Plena of Puerto Rico, the Cumbia from Colombia, and the Calypso from Guyana/Venezuela to name a few.

Cla cla cla, the cencerro held the tempo as its sound rang out in the auditorium at ChiArts. Perfect time, held by the constant movement of the musicians left foot, like the feet of Rumberos on the move, dancing their way from Matanzas to the Bronx and beyond. Flanked by guitar on his right and bass on his left, the hands of the visiting Congero radiated deep history and tradition, making the congas fly and sing so smoothly, so effortlessly: Pibo the musician, Pibo the master, Pibo the teacher.

In addition to the performance at the Chicago High School for the Arts, Pibo Marquez was gracious enough to host a workshop/jam session with students from Clemente Community Academy’s steel band. The musician reflected that he was incredibly moved by the experience at both schools.  Read more about the man and buy music from Joel “Pibo Marquez at his website.
Clemente Freshman Invest in Politics Through Film

Clemente Freshman Invest in Politics Through Film

 

by Luis Salgado, Roberto Clemente Community Academy

Director Josh Rech recently visited the Clemente freshmen to show the students his movies.  All freshmen will be creating original films, and Rech provided tips and tricks for students to use as they begin to make their own movies. In World Studies class, students have been studying ideology and propaganda and have been collaborating in small groups to create their own movies. Before getting started, however, students were able to pick Rech’s brain on ideas such as framing, lighting, sound, and directing.
Rech was able to share his two original movies that he made, as well as give students ideas for their upcoming project. The filmmaker also shared his personal story about how he turned his passion of movies into a lifelong profession. Rech answered questions that students formulated about strategies for making movies, suggestions on chasing a dream as a profession, and on how Rech got into the filmmaking profession. Rech also showed clips and images from Oscar Award winning movies and analyzed how they used techniques such as framing, lighting, and sound to build emotion in their movie. Finally, students watched his short film and asked questions, while some students were even brave enough to provide critical analysis and suggestions for improvement. After each class, multiple students came to speak to Rech about how to pursue their career in film.  They also exchanged email addresses for further questions and feedback. If interested in seeing Rech’s movies or contacting him for inquiries, visit his website at joshrech.com.
Students have used techniques learned from Rech’s suggestion when they created their own videos with Clemente’s professional cameras.  Students also edited their videos in the Clemente recording studio. Using iMovie, students turned their hours of footage into short movies on a political topic of their choice. The freshmen then returned to the auditorium to show off their movies to the class. Students enjoyed the unique challenge that this IB assessment provided.  The students reflected on the experience and described how working on their writing, directing, camera, and editing skills has shaped their identity as an International Baccalaureate student.
CONSULTING SERVICES
What We Offer

Our goal is to help make your business as efficient and profitable as possible. We will work with you to help solve your problems, while understanding that you have limited resources and budget. Upon completion, we will present to you a written assessment of your business and recommendations for improving inefficiencies and cost. Sign up today.

CONSULTING SERVICES
What We Offer

Our goal is to help make your business as efficient and profitable as possible. We will work with you to help solve your problems, while understanding that you have limited resources and budget. Upon completion, we will present to you a written assessment of your business and recommendations for improving inefficiencies and cost. Sign up today.

“Dystopia, language, and perception in The Handmaid’s Tale”

“Dystopia, language, and perception in The Handmaid’s Tale”

by Luis Salgado, Roberto Clemente Community Academy
This week students have been identifying and analyzing neologisms and appropriated words in Margaret Atwood’s novel The Handmaid’s Tale. Juniors in Mr. Connor’s English-3 class have been hard at work analyzing dystopian societies to consider how we ought to organize our communities. Dystopian literature features authoritarian governments and sci-fi elements to make readers consider their own societies. As an IB-aligned curriculum, students sharpen inquiry and critical thinking skills while reflecting on their own lives.
The Handmaid’s Tale follows a woman in the dystopian Republic of Gilead. The totalitarian government attempts to control its citizens through fear, military threat, and even language itself by coining new words and changing the definition of others.
To trace how the Republic of Gilead used language to maintain power, students learned the key vocabulary terms neologism and appropriation. Students began by analyzing the roots of both words and identifying similar words. A neologism is a newly created word. An appropriated word is one used by a group in a new way.  Students identified slang terms as neologisms and taught them to the class. Then, students considered how the word “queer” was re-appropriated by LGBTQ communities as a term of strength.
Students then divided into groups and worked collaboratively to identify possible words in the text. Students quickly found that there were many words that they were unfamiliar with. Rather than become frustrated, students exemplified how IB students are knowledgabe by fluidly teaching each other vocabulary. After identifying a number of neologisms and appropriated words, students analyzed the implications as a class-recognizing the extent to which the government controls the perception of its citizens through strategic word choice. Students will put this knowledge into practice by making their own propaganda in the weeks to come.
Only four performance remain! Join UTC’s Benefit Performance Closing Bash this Sunday, March 13. Doors open at 2pm for the final performance of “Adoration of the Old Woman” by José Rivera. There will be musical performances before and after the show as well as a delicious home cooked Puerto Rican meal by UTC’s executive director’s (Ivan Vega) mother, known as Mama Vega. Beer + Wine included. Don’t miss out!
CONGRATULATIONS ROBERTO CLEMENTE COMMUNITY ACADEMY!

CONGRATULATIONS ROBERTO CLEMENTE COMMUNITY ACADEMY!

Roberto Clemente Community Academy has been nominated and selected as one of UNIVISION’s exceptional schools across the District to be highlighted through February.
Below is a copy of the commemorative graphic which will air during the broadcast.
Roberto Clemente Community Academy’s on-air mention will be on February 29, 2016 at 5 and10pm.
My Experience with Project Prepare

My Experience with Project Prepare

By Nicholas Ramos
There are many things I have experienced in Project Prepare at Roberto Clemente Community Academy over the last couple of months, and thanks to Amy and Sarah it has been smooth sailing. For starters, what is Project Prepare? Project Prepare is a program to assist students in developing skills to help them prepare for college and the workforce. My first time going to Project Prepare was when I turned sixteen. I couldn’t wait to get a job, and I was so excited that the day after my birthday I went to my BAM counselor and told him that I wanted a job right away! That same day, he took me to Project Prepare and that’s when I met Amy. She was so kind and encouraging and I couldn’t even count the “wows” when she heard the experience I built up to prepare for the day I’d get my first real job.
One important thing she did recently was help me out with my resume. I didn’t even know how to start, and she guided me step by step in the long process that would help make me stand out professionally for someone my age. Throughout the process of creating my resume, we talked about how I can make my first impression, which is key for a good interview. One of the goals of Project Prepare is to help me and other students stand out in the interview process for jobs and college. I am already feeling more confident that when I interview and begin working I will have already begun developing the skills needed to succeed in the workplace.
Another experience I had was when we were applying for a job. It was pretty hard at first, but then Amy guided me in the application process. The way she explained it to me and walked me through the process really helped. Within two weeks, I was feeling confident enough to do it on my own. After I applied, Amy and I discussed the process of what to do if I haven’t heard anything back. We talked about how I could call them to try to set up an interview. I have now called a couple of places I have applied to. Each time before I call, Amy and I talk about what I am going to say and act it out so it is easier for me to talk the hiring manager.
Finally, another experience I had in Project Prepare was learning the step by step process of what an actual interview looks and feels like. One of the things we talked about in this process of an interview is how I would present myself physically and emotionally. We discussed how I can make a great first impression to whoever is interviewing me and going to be giving me the job.
With my resume, job applications, techniques to avoid feeling nervous when I am calling about the job, and the skills for how I present myself, I feel very prepared to be entering the workforce. Even after I get a job, I am still going to work with Project Prepare so I can keep improving my job skills and be ready for college and the career of my future. I want young kids like me that are still in high school to be able to realize how easy it is to feel job ready when they work with Project Prepare. The amazing staff members with Project Prepare have made it easier for me to begin the process of job searching and I am now 100% more confident that when I do get a job I will be ready.
Acknowledging El Día de los Reyes

Acknowledging El Día de los Reyes

by Spanish AP Class, Roberto Clemente Community Academy
Often we stop to celebrate or participate in traditions and holidays, but… sometimes without knowing exactly why. “What is El Día de los Reyes?”  “Why is it celebrated?”  “And … how?”  These are all questions asked by Clemente´s AP Spanish Language and Culture students.
Exploring the history and culture of “Three Kings’ Day,” students learned that, in addition to the many people who celebrate Christmas, there are also people who celebrate the day when three kings (or wise men) named Balthasar of Arabia, Melchior of Persia, and Gaspar of India – after learning of the birth of a new King – arrived to his manger where he was born, to bring him gifts.
In recognition of this special day and as in the case with many holidays, there is often more than one way to celebrate. It was learned that children leave a treat for the 3 Wise Men and hay for their camels (kind of like leaving cookies for Santa) for their long journey. In return, small gifts may be left for the children. Adults spend time with friends and family and share a Rosca de Reyes, similar to a large fruitcake but in the shape of a crown. Baked inside this Rosca are anywhere from one to four baby dolls, symbolic of the baby Jesus. Tradition says that whoever gets the piece with the baby inside has to host a party on February 2nd. Both quite confused and fascinated by this tradition, Clemente students wanted to experience this custom first hand…and that’s exactly what they did.
Students were provided the opportunity to partake in a Rosca de Reyes, gathering around it first to simply get a good look at what it looks like…and it looked just as described … a crown fit for a king! Anxious to cut the slices, afterward each student received a piece of bread…one by one…with anticipation and excitement for seeing if the baby was baked into their piece! “I ate rosca when I was younger, traditionally. It’s been years and so it reminded me of my childhood,” shared senior Armanni Varela.
Students enjoyed having this opportunity to learn about this special day, taste a new pastry in class, and most importantly to learn that two of their classmates now have to – instead of hosting a party – bring a treat for the class on February 2!  Senior Jocelyn Ramirez-Arreola expressed, “I had tried rosca before, but I didn’t know what it was for until now.  My piece had the baby in it and so now I have to think about what treat I want to bring!”
“We used to eat rosca in elementary school and they’d also give us some candy in a shoe. So it brought back memories. Even though we celebrated, I wasn’t really sure what the baby meant, especially since I never got it in my piece of bread.” Kyle Rodriguez.   Sorry you never got the baby, Kyle! Better luck, next year!